Ansys Provides Competitive Edge to Future Workforce


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Through the launch of its Electronics Desktop product for students, Ansys lowers the barrier to adoption for electronics simulation software and fuels the incoming workforce with a skillset necessary for next-gen innovation. The new student software provides free access to Ansys’ industry-leading Electronics product line—rounding out its existing and comprehensive student offerings for Ansys’ Mechanical, Fluids, Discovery and SCADE products.

As companies around the world grow more dependent on simulation to overcome complex design challenges, there is an intense demand for simulation-trained engineers. The new addition to Ansys’ Academic Program will empower students to further develop this critical skillset for electronics design and provide them a competitive edge in the job market. 

“Through its robust Academic Program, Ansys helps engineering students become successful both inside and outside of the classroom,” said Kathryn Leigh Smith, assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte. “The addition of Electronics Desktop for students makes self-learning easier and more accessible. In addition, the Electronics-based Innovation Courses we jointly developed with Ansys empower students to level-up their education across physics disciplines.” 

Students with access to the Ansys Electronics Desktop Student product can support self-paced learning inside and outside of the classroom through thirteen related Ansys Innovation Courses. The free software download and courses put learning in the hands of the student while also enabling educators to present and reinforce various physics concepts.

“Supporting engineers during every phase of their career is a top priority for Ansys. This launch will enable students to excel in an increasingly competitive, dynamic and evolving global economy, and – ultimately – help shape the future of product design as these students become the next generation of inventors,” said Prith Banerjee, chief technology officer at Ansys. “Since we launched Ansys Student, the most popular content request we received from students is free electronics training. Today, we’re delivering on those requests—eliminating barriers and improving access for students at the undergraduate and graduate levels.” 

The Ansys Academic Program provides simulation software and materials education resources to support research and engineering, science and design curricula for more than 2,750 universities around the world. Beyond free student products, which have surpassed 1.8 million downloads, Ansys provides tools and resources for learning and developing simulation skills, including the Ansys Learning Forum, Ansys Innovation Courses, and university-based student team sponsorships.

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