Altium, AWS Collaborate to Advance Electronic Design


Reading time ( words)

Altium LLC is committed to bringing transformation to the electronics industry through a digital platform that connects design to the supply chain and the manufacturing floor. To achieve this goal, Altium selected Amazon Web Services (AWS) to host Altium 365, the cloud platform for collaborative PCB design and realization.

 The Altium 365 cloud-based platform and Altium Designer elevates PCB design by creating seamless collaboration points across the development process, making it the most connected design experience in the industry. This streamlines the product development process and allows engineers and designers to create smart and connected electronic products faster than ever before.

With Altium 365, users can bring together the stakeholders and participants in the electronic design process—even if they do not have Altium Designer—while keeping IPs secure and designs under control.  Altium 365 provides a completely new way to share, visualize, and mark-up PCB designs for all stakeholders involved, from design managers to manufacturers, while allowing other designers to connect to the same PCB design with Altium Designer to author changes.

“AWS is central to Altium 365’s success to keep the platform, customers’ designs, and data secure, available and accessible,” said Greg Bellasis, Altium’s Director of Cybersecurity. “A broad portfolio of AWS services and the collaboration with their enterprise support team helps us achieve this goal to ensure ongoing stability, security, and reliability for our users to connect with anyone, from anywhere, in any time zone and from any web-enabled device to get their job done.”

Teams can organize designs, libraries, and participants in one place, and share links to their designs for easy, real-time collaboration. Designs are accessible at any time, on any device, anywhere, thanks to AWS’s proven global infrastructure. By leveraging CAD-specific intelligence, design data can be stored in a way that makes projects, files and version history accessible and easy to navigate on the web.

As Michael Weston, Lead Engineer in Kinetic Vision’s Product Design and Development Group, explains, “We switched over to Altium 365 in January 2020 because we needed a more stable platform for our data and collaboration methods compared to the local methods we were using, but with the COVID-19 situation, the platform became even more essential because our team members could continue to work remotely. Altium 365 has given us more power to create brilliant work—no matter where our team is working from.”

“There’s a broad recognition that cloud is a more secure place to do collaborative projects than traditional on-premises infrastructures,” said David Pellerin, head of Worldwide Business Development for Infotech/Semiconductor at AWS. “By using the cloud to secure their most sensitive data and improve efficiencies and maximize collaboration, Altium and their customers can free up developers and engineers to focus on innovation.”

By combining the flexibility of sharing and collaboration in the cloud with the power of desktop PCB design software, Altium is making a big leap towards modernizing and transforming the way the electronics industry meets the growing demand for smart and connected products.

About Altium

Altium LLC, a global software company headquartered in San Diego, California is accelerating the pace of innovation through electronics. For over 30 years, Altium has been delivering software that maximizes the productivity of PCB designers and electrical engineers. From individual inventors to multinational corporations, more PCB designers and engineers choose Altium software to design and realize electronics-based products.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Why We Simulate

04/29/2021 | Bill Hargin, Z-zero
When Bill Hargin was cutting his teeth in high-speed PCB design some 25 years ago, speeds were slow, layer counts were low, dielectric constants and loss tangents were high, design margins were wide, copper roughness didn’t matter, and glass-weave styles didn’t matter. Dielectrics were called “FR-4” and their properties didn’t matter much. A fast PCI bus operated at just 66 MHz. Times have certainly changed.

Bridging the Simulation Tool Divide

04/12/2021 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
Todd Westerhoff of Siemens EDA recently spoke with the I-Connect007 Editorial Team about the divide between users of high-powered enterprise simulation tools and those who need a more practical tool for everyday use, and how Siemens is working to bridge the gap. Todd also shared his views on why so many engineers do not use simulation, as well as advice for engineers just getting started with simulation tools.

Barry Olney’s High-Speed Simulation Primer

04/09/2021 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
The I-Connect007 editorial team recently spoke with Barry Olney of iCD about simulation. Barry, a columnist for Design007 Magazine, explains why simulation tools can have such a steep learning curve, and why many design engineers are still not using simulation on complex high-speed designs.



Copyright © 2021 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.