PADS Paper: 10 Things to Know about Thermal Design


Reading time ( words)

As designs get smaller, power densities at all packaging levels increase dramatically. Removing heat is critical to the operation and long-term reliability of electronics, and component temperatures within specification are the universal criteria used to determine the acceptability of a design.

Cooling solutions directly add weight, volume, and cost to the product, without delivering any functional benefit. What they provide is reliability. Without cooling, most electronic products would fail in a matter of minutes. Leakage current, and thus leakage power, goes up with smaller die-level feature sizes.

Because leakage is temperature-dependent, thermal design is more important. How should engineers who develop products with complex and/or high-power electronics ensure the thermal performance of their products while meeting other design criteria?

To answer this question, this PADS paper will take a look at 10 things you should know about thermal design of electronic products. To download this paper, click here.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Words of Advice: Planning a New Design

06/06/2019 | The I-Connect007 Team
In a recent survey, we asked the following question: What do you think is the most important thing a designer should remember when planning a new PCB design? Here are a few of the answers, edited slightly for clarity.

Design Rules Recipe: Solvability, Manufacturability, and Performance

06/06/2019 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
One thing that we’ve noticed lately: Each designer seems to have his or her own way of using PCB design rules. There doesn’t seem to be much agreement about setting or using design rules. So, in this true experts panel, Mike Creeden of San Diego PCB joined Freedom CAD’s Scott McCurdy, Jay Carbone, and Rich Kluever to share their views on PCB design rules.

Wild River, eSilicon, and Samtec Team up for 112-Gbps Test Vehicle

06/06/2019 | Andy Shaughnessy, Design007 Magazine
During DesignCon, I sat down for an interview with Tim Horel from eSilicon, Al Neves of Wild River Technology, and Matt Burns from Samtec. They’ve recently teamed up to create a 112-Gbps test vehicle that may be the first of its kind of test fixture.



Copyright © 2019 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.