Ansys, Electro Magnetic Applications Launch EMA3D Charge


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Together with Electro Magnetic Applications, Ansys added EMA3D Charge to its industry-leading simulation solution portfolio, addressing critical design and safety needs for applications ranging from space exploration to everyday commutes. The new solution enhances predictive accuracy for engineers analyzing charging and discharging events that can lead to catastrophic product failures early in the design cycle, driving faster time-to-market and bottom-line savings.

Aerospace, electronics and automotive industries must meet rigorous electrical performance requirements to mitigate safety risks related to charging and discharging events. Engineers need to be confident a spacecraft will survive exposure to space plasma. High-voltage systems must operate safely without risk of fire. Autonomous vehicles must maintain safety critical functions when faced with an unexpected electrical event. Without fully understanding and addressing these risks, companies may face costly late-phase redesigns, often totaling millions of dollars.  

High-fidelity predictions from EMA3D Charge provide engineers with a deeper understanding of electrical charging and discharging phenomena. These insights can have a significant impact on product design, helping engineers determine how electrical components may be harmed — and to what extent — by charging and discharging events. Mitigating risks early in the design phase reduces the chances of late-stage redesigns and costly product failures.

“EMA3D Charge has an impressive array of capabilities,” said EMC engineers at NASA Johnson Space Center. “For example, its ability to easily manipulate and mesh mechanical computer-aided design (CAD) models greatly simplifies the process of going from a structural model of the spacecraft to analytical results. We have also seen great value in its ability to perform charging analysis on spacecraft that are being charged by direct contact with lunar dusts whilst simultaneously being charged from exposure to space plasmas on or near the lunar surface.”

While the technology within EMA3D Charge has been applied in the electronics and aerospace industry before, the solution is the first to be focused entirely on charging and discharging prediction. Leveraging Ansys SpaceClaim to create an intuitive user interface and workflow, EMA3D Charge combines CAD import, design and simplification, simulation setup and meshing, and result generalization and visualization into one solver technology.

“EMA3D Charge fills a need in a marketplace in which no other simulation product exists,” said Shane Emswiler, senior vice president of products at Ansys. “Engineers simulating charging and discharging events once had to navigate multiple codes and challenging workflows that fell short of a full solution. EMA3D Charge is a full solution—one that provides high-fidelity analysis and an end-to-end workflow designed for efficiency.”

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