IPC Releases IPC-2581 Revision C for PCB Design


Reading time ( words)

IPC-2581C, Generic Requirement for Printed Board Assembly Product Manufacturing Description Data and Transfer Methodology is the eagerly anticipated update of IPC’s widely adopted global standard for PCB design through manufacturing data flow. Revision C introduces groundbreaking new features, automation supporting Industry 4.0, and bidirectional DFX intelligence capability that eliminates the time-consuming back and forth between design house and manufacturers before production can begin.

As technology in the industry progresses, including the latest additive processes with embedded components within the PCB, the IPC-2581 committee of experts has introduced support for the latest technologies, representing every aspect of modern PCB design. Updates include overhauled support for rigid-flex, embedded components, cavities, coins, attenuation parameters, connector ports, pin polarities, edge plating, countersink/counterbore, square drill, and intended net-shorts.

Ensuring that all related data is in digital form, IPC-2581 represents the method of choice for automation between design and manufacturing, significantly surpassing proprietary and legacy formats.

As a specific highlight, revision C includes the bi-directional DFX data exchange through which feedback between design and manufacturing is conveyed and tracked before manufacturing begins.

“DFM checking and resolution can be a frustrating and time-consuming process that poses little overall benefit for our customers” said Greg Link, FAE manager for WUS Printed Circuits. “IPC-2581 revision C addresses the need for a collaborative, executable exchange for DFM issues eliminating spreadsheets, PowerPoints, and emails, accelerating new product introduction for our customers."

“As the industry continues to move toward digital data exchange, the timing is right for the technology behind IPC-2581C to bring the opportunity for critical savings and efficiencies in engineering workload. The update benefits both design and manufacturing, supporting agility and responsiveness within the holistic electronics manufacturing process,” stated Matt Kelly, IPC chief technologist.               

“IPC-2581C is also a major component of the digital twin architecture and strategy, setting the standard for interoperability between different digital twin solutions, bringing maximum value from data,” Kelly added. “IPC-2581 revision C is much more than an incremental update, providing the industry’s only fully digitalized and automated data exchange. It is ready to be a critical part of any PCB fabrication and assembly manufacturing smart factory strategy.”

Share

Print


Suggested Items

‘The Trouble with Tribbles’

06/17/2021 | Dana Korf, Korf Consultancy
The original Star Trek series came into my life in 1966 as I was entering sixth grade. I was fascinated by the technology being used, such as communicators and phasers, and the crazy assortment of humans and aliens in each episode. My favorite episode is “The Trouble with Tribbles,” an episode combining cute Tribbles, science, and good/bad guys—sprinkled with sarcastic humor.

IPC-2581 Revision C: Complete Build Intent for Rigid-Flex

04/30/2021 | Ed Acheson, Cadence Design Systems
With the current design transfer formats, rigid-flex designers face a hand-off conundrum. You know the situation: My rigid-flex design is done so now it is time to get this built and into the product. Reviewing the documentation reveals that there are tables to define the different stackup definitions used in the design. The cross-references for the different zones to areas of the design are all there, I think. The last time a zone definition was missed, we caused a costly mistake.

Why We Simulate

04/29/2021 | Bill Hargin, Z-zero
When Bill Hargin was cutting his teeth in high-speed PCB design some 25 years ago, speeds were slow, layer counts were low, dielectric constants and loss tangents were high, design margins were wide, copper roughness didn’t matter, and glass-weave styles didn’t matter. Dielectrics were called “FR-4” and their properties didn’t matter much. A fast PCI bus operated at just 66 MHz. Times have certainly changed.



Copyright © 2021 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.