Just Ask Happy: Stacked Microvia Reliability Issues


Reading time ( words)

We asked for you to send in your questions for Happy Holden, and you took us up on it! The questions you've posed run the gamut, covering technology, the worldwide fab market, and everything in between. Enjoy.

Q: Stacked microvias look good on paper, but they may have reliability problems. What are the best rules for designing stacked microvias to ensure a reliable PCB?

A: The current best practice is stacking no more than two layers, and then moving over for the next buried or blind via or stacking two layers there. The stacked vias should never be stacked on any buried vias.

An IPC committee is currently testing various stacked via configurations to have a comparison for reliability and testing coupons and design. Hopefully, they will also get at the root cause of why stacked microvias are failing at their interface.

To pose your own question for Happy Holden, take the survey by clicking here.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

I-Connect007 Editor’s Choice: Five Must-Reads for the Week

10/23/2020 | Andy Shaughnessy, Design007 Magazine
After a crazy year like this, we shouldn’t be surprised that this trade show season is unlike any other. Here’s one of the many “silver linings” of 2020: We actually dodged a bullet earlier this year when COVID-19 hit after most of our industry’s big events had taken place. In this week’s top five, we have an assortment of trade show and conference news items, plus a few examples of technological trends and innovation.

I-Connect007 Editor's Choice: Five Must-Reads for the Week

10/09/2020 | Andy Shaughnessy, Design007 Magazine
It’s showtime! This past week, we saw quite a bit of news about virtual trade shows. It’s great to see show managers pivot from live, in-person events to virtual shows with only a few months to make it all happen. How would you like to be a show manager today?

Combatting Thermal Challenges With TRM Software

10/07/2020 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
Johannes Adam is the creator of a simulation tool called Thermal Risk Management (TRM) used to help PCB designers and design engineers predict hot spots on the board before during layout. He and Douglas Brooks, founder of UltraCAD Design, have used the tool to produce several technical articles and a book on the subject. In this interview, they tackle the biggest misconceptions they see from designers and engineers who deal with thermal management issues.



Copyright © 2020 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.