Arlon Takes on High-Power Failure


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During IPC APEX EXPO 2020 in San Diego, California, the I-Connect007 Editorial Team met with some of the industry's top executives, managers, and engineers.

In this video interview from the show, Pete Starkey and Dave Nelson, director of business development at Arlon Electronic Materials, explore causes of failure in high-power PCBs and explain how resin cracking during drilling can be overcoming using thermally conductive filled resin.

IPC APEX EXPO is the largest PCB industry event in North America. The next IPC APEX EXPO will be held January 26-28, 2021, at the San Diego Convention Center.

To watch this interview, click here.

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