Electronics Manufacturers Applaud Bipartisan USMCA Deal


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The following statement can be attributed to John Mitchell, IPC president and CEO:

“We are pleased that leaders in the U.S. Congress and the Trump administration, as well as the governments of Canada and Mexico and key stakeholders, have reached consensus on USMCA. The agreement is a positive step for the electronics manufacturing industry and millions of U.S. workers and consumers. By prioritizing a modernized and strengthened trade relationship between the U.S., Canada and Mexico, all three nations can strengthen the region's supply chains, expand trade opportunities with partners abroad, and reinforce North America as a bastion of strength and stability in an uncertain world.

“With electronics exports making up over 30% of U.S. exports of manufactured goods, natural resources and energy exports to Mexico and nearly 20% of such exports to Canada, USMCA will pave the way for continued growth in the electronics industry.

“We thank House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer for their steadfast efforts to bring this trade agreement to fruition, and we call on the U.S. Congress, Mexican Congress, and Canadian Parliament to act swiftly to pass the agreement’s implementing legislation.”

Today, IPC sent a letter to congressional members, urging them to vote promptly and affirmatively on implementing legislation.  

In May, IPC released a study that found the total value of U.S. electronics trade with Canada and Mexico was $155.5 billion in 2017, with trade in electronic systems and components being especially important to the North American automobile industry. Mexico imports 34% of U.S. printed circuit board production—larger than the next four largest markets combined.

About IPC
IPC (www.IPC.org) is a global industry association based in Bannockburn, Ill., dedicated to the competitive excellence and financial success of its 5,700 member-company sites which represent all facets of the electronics industry, including design, printed board manufacturing, electronics assembly and test. As a member-driven organization and leading source for industry standards, training, market research and public policy advocacy, IPC supports programs to meet the needs of an estimated $2 trillion global electronics industry. IPC maintains additional offices in Taos, N.M.; Washington, D.C.; Atlanta, Ga.; Brussels, Belgium; Stockholm, Sweden; Moscow, Russia; Bangalore and New Delhi, India; Bangkok, Thailand; and Qingdao, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Chengdu, Suzhou and Beijing, China.

 

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