Words of Advice: When do You Get Involved in the PCB Design Cycle?


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In a recent survey, we asked the following question: Where in the process do you typically get involved with a design project? Here are a few of the answers, edited slightly for clarity. 

  1. Making library parts, then generally not until most of the schematic is complete. My main job is layout.
  2. When “they” decide what “they” want.
  3. For me as a service bureau, it starts when the schematic is either complete or close enough to get the work started. For some long term customers, I'm asked to join in on the planning.
  4. When the schematic is done, and they ask, “Can you make all of this stuff fit into a box this big?”
  5. Typically kickoff meetings decide who does what, schedule, and expectations. And then a design study for feasibility and layout.

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