Orange County Chapter of the DC Designers Council Meeting January 22


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The Orange County Chapter of the DC Designers Council will hold its January Lunch ‘n’ Learn meeting January 22, John Carney, an application engineer at Cadence Design Systems, will be the featured presenter. He has an EE degree and supports all of the Allegro and Sigrity products.

John will be presenting on two topics:

First presentation:   

“Signal Integrity Effects of Different PCB Structures”
This presentation will discuss the following:

  • Return path vias for single-ended and differential pairs.
  • How the void around the differential via pair structure effects signal integrity.
  • How back-drilling effects signal integrity and an eye diagram.
  • Fiber weave effects.
  • Tabbed routing.
  • Inductive compensation.

Second presentation:

“Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Basics, and How it Will Affect PCB Design”
This presentation will discuss the following:

  • Machine Learning vs Artificial intelligence vs deep learning.
  • How a machine “learns”
  • PCB based examples of different types of Machine Learning.
  • DARPA’s plans for AI and PCB design
  • Other examples from industry leaders

Reserve a spot on your calendar for Tuesday, January 22 from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm for this educational “Lunch ‘n’ Learn” event. 

Location

Harvard Athletic Park multi-purpose room (at the SOUTH end of the athletic fields)
14701 Harvard Avenue
Irvine, California 92606

The cost to attend this Lunch ‘n Learn event will be $10 at the door. Lunch will be sponsored by EMA Design Automation. Several prizes will be raffled off, including a six-month OrCAD license.

Please RSVP no later than noon on Monday, January 21

There are TWO ways to RSVP:

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