Cadence Sigrity PowerDC Supports Future Facilities' Open Format


Reading time ( words)

Cadence Sigrity PowerDC technology now supports Future Facilities’ new open neutral file format, which solves the challenge of sharing design models between different thermal simulation toolsets. The PowerDC technology’s adoption of the single, open-model file format streamlines the thermal supply chain, promotes interoperability and data exchange, and enables customers to improve their thermal and electrical designs while also accelerating their schedule. With easy access to thermal models, design teams using PowerDC technology can shorten design cycle time by up to two weeks.

Thermal and electrical component suppliers currently develop and provide their customers with proprietary model files that support different tools, which is a time-consuming and error-prone process. Future Facilities’ open model format enables these suppliers to develop a single common model file that works with all vendors’ simulation tools supporting the neutral file format. The PowerDC technology can read in this component model file and use it directly, saving customers valuable time and resources otherwise spent obtaining or recreating a component model from the supplier.

Adopting the neutral file format enables interoperability and data exchange between traditional thermal/mechanical engineering tools and PowerDC technology, improving overall productivity between mechanical and electrical engineering design teams. This allows them to explore variants and run more iterations, leading to better designs that meet product cost requirements.

“Over the years, we have seen significant demand from our customer base for seamless data transfer from various tools. The neutral file format allows us to take an important first step in democratizing the thermal industry, bringing it on par with the MCAD and ECAD markets where neutral file formats are the norm,” said Akhil Docca, corporate marketing manager at Future Facilities. “With support from Cadence, we look forward to bringing a single, common format to the thermal engineering and simulation community.”

“Electrical and thermal co-simulation is rapidly becoming a requirement for our customers," said An-Yu Kuo, senior group director, R&D at Cadence. “A key enabling factor for these co-simulations is unification of the various thermal model formats into a common neutral file format that can be used by all EDA tools. To help our customers focus on the critical electrical and thermal co-simulations needed for their designs, we offer them easy access to thermal models by supporting Future Facilities’ neutral file format in our Sigrity PowerDC technology.”

About Cadence

Cadence enables electronic systems and semiconductor companies to create the innovative end products that are transforming the way people live, work and play. Cadence® software, hardware and semiconductor IP are used by customers to deliver products to market faster. The company’s System Design Enablement strategy helps customers develop differentiated products—from chips to boards to systems—in mobile, consumer, cloud datacenter, automotive, aerospace, IoT, industrial and other market segments. Cadence is listed as one of Fortune Magazine's 100 Best Companies to Work For. Learn more here.

Share


Suggested Items

Faster Board Speeds Demand Constraint-Driven Design

06/19/2018 | Ralf Bruening, Zuken
Using powerful constraint techniques can be a double-edged sword. While the design process is made much safer by including constraints, it is all too easy to over-constrain the design and make it impossible to complete routing and placement. Even paper design guidelines can make products uneconomic to produce unless a great deal of engineering knowledge is applied during the design.

Making the Most of PCB Materials for 5G Microwave and mmWave Amps

06/13/2018 | John Coonrod, Rogers Corporation
Ready or not, 5G is coming, and it will require the right circuit materials for many different types of high-frequency circuits, including power amplifiers. 5G represents the latest and greatest in wireless technology, and it will be challenging to design and fabricate, starting with the circuit board materials, because it will operate across many different frequencies, such as 6 GHz and below, as well as at millimeter-wave frequencies (typically 30 GHz and above).

Field Trip: CID Class Sees How Flex is Made at Streamline Circuits

06/06/2018 | Kelly Dack, CID+, EPTAC
While I was teaching my CID class for EPTAC in Santa Clara, I learned that we were only a block away from Streamline Circuits. Streamline does a lot of military and aerospace work, as well as communications and industrial electronics. The company manufactures quite a bit of multilayer flex and rigid-flex circuits, in addition to rigid boards. This would make a great field trip for my CID class!



Copyright © 2018 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.