Leo Lambert Discusses EPTAC’s Evolving Mission


Reading time ( words)

This month we’ve been dealing with challenges related to being a great manager and a great leader. One of the biggest problems a manager faces is training—getting employees trained, and keeping them current on constantly changing technologies. I asked Leo Lambert, VP and CTO of EPTAC, what his thoughts were on the subject of leadership, and more specifically, what strategies EPTAC embraces with regard to training—both initial and ongoing.

Andy Shaughnessy: Leo, please give us a quick background on EPTAC and the training you provide.

Leo Lambert: EPTAC is a certified IPC training center, and we train to all the IPC programs, including IPC-A-600, IPC-A-610, J-STD-001, WHMA/IPC-A-620, IPC-7711/7721, and IPC-6012. We hold these classes all over the country and in our local facility in Manchester, New Hampshire. We are the largest training center supplying IPC training to the industry.

We offer and sell training materials to support our customers who train their own personnel and conduct webinars on a monthly basis, discussing current topics within our industry. We answer customers’ questions in our Solder Tips section and believe this Q&A is really helpful to the industry. Our Ask Helena & Leo section allows anyone to ask questions related to electronic manufacturing and more. We also provide news about the latest things happening within the industry and within EPTAC itself.

Shaughnessy: Have your training methods evolved over time?

Lambert: Our offerings to the industry include a manual soldering program, along with an advance manual soldering program dealing with 0402, 0201 and 01005 component sizes. This program is modified at the request of our customers to fit their needs.

We also have incorporated additional workmanship programs to the IPC 610 and 620 programs where we teach the students how to inspect the product and physically build a cable with the appropriate crimps and strip lengths.

Additionally, we’ve developed workshops designed for engineers and supervisors to provide them with a quick look at the standards, so that they can understand the content and intent of the programs.

Shaughnessy: How has the curriculum itself changed?

Lambert: The curriculum is always changing based upon the existing and changing technology in tooling, materials, products and documentation. We don’t normally focus on the computer skills necessary to run the equipment, but from what I’ve seen on the manufacturing floor, the skill levels needed are to troubleshoot the equipment when the unit malfunctions or stops. The operators are trained to read the screens, selecting the various programs to be run depending upon the product, and to get in touch with maintenance if a major deviation occurs.

To read this entire article, which appeared in the October 2016 issue of The PCB Design Magazine, click here.

Share


Suggested Items

APCT Moves into Rigid-Flex with Cartel, Cirtech Acquisition

06/18/2018 | Andy Shaughnessy
When I spoke with APCT President Steve Robinson a year ago, he said he was interested in adding flex and rigid-flex capabilities, and working closely with designers and engineers. With the recent acquisition of Cartel and their subsidiary Cirtech, APCT now has a flex and rigidflex facility, along with military and aerospace certifications. At DesignCon 2018, I asked Steve to discuss these acquisitions and what they mean for APCT and their customers.

Estonia a Hot Spot for New Technology

04/23/2018 | Andy Shaughnessy, Design007 Magazine
Most Westerners know very little about Estonia. A former Soviet Bloc country, Estonia has come a long way since restoring its independence in 1991. Electronics companies are thriving in this tiny EU member country, and capital city Tallinn has been called “Silicon Valley on the Baltic Sea.” During productronica, I met with Arno Kolk, general manager of the Estonian Electronics Industries Association, and we discussed the explosion of new technology in this “Baltic Tiger” country?

Out-of-the-Box Innovation Strikes a Chord at NAMM 2018

02/09/2018 | Dick Crowe, I-Connect007
The National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) holds two shows each year; the first is in Anaheim in January, and the second in Nashville in July. The January show is huge, attracting 100,000 visitors during its four-day run. My friend and editor (and bass player) Dan Feinberg has discussed how difficult it was for him to cover the CES show in a few days, and I must echo that sentiment about NAMM. It is one gigantic show.



Copyright © 2018 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.